Monday, April 8, 2013

Yale and Julliard Students to Perform Bach's Mass in B Minor in Singapore


This looks like an event for all classical music lovers, irregardless of taste or instrument of choice. Students ensembles from both Yale and Julliard will present Bach's Mass in B Minor on 9 June 2013, conducted by famed Japanese baroque conductor Masaaki Suzuki. Here's more information about the performers, courtesy of Julliard's website:

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The Yale Schola Cantorum, founded in 2003, is a 24-voice chamber choir that sings in concerts and choral services. Supported by the Yale Institute of Sacred Music with the School of Music and open by audition to all Yale students, it specializes in music before 1750 and the last hundred years.

The Yale Baroque Ensemble is a new postgraduate ensemble at the Yale School of Music dedicated to the highest level of study and performance of Baroque repertoire.

Juilliard415 is the performing ensemble of Juilliard Historical Performance. This newly-established program provides a comprehensive course of study for exceptional graduate-level musicians who have a special interest in period-instrument performance. With an emphasis on music from the High Baroque through the early Classical eras performed on appropriate instruments, the performance-oriented curriculum brings together some of the most prominent period-instrument performers, scholars, and teachers in the world.

Since founding the Bach Collegium Japan in 1990, Masaaki Suzuki has established himself as a leading authority on the works of J.S. Bach. He has remained the group’s music director ever since, taking it regularly to major venues and festivals in Europe and the U.S. His impressive discography on the BIS label, featuring Bach’s complete works for harpsichord and his interpretations of Bach’s major choral works and sacred cantatas with Bach Collegium Japan (of which he has already completed over forty volumes of a project to record the complete series) have brought him much praise.

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